Faculty Books

The following books were written by faculty and emeritus faculty. They are organized by year and listed alphabetically by the faculty member’s last name.

Published in 2021

  • Angela N. H. Creager, History, “Risk on the Table: Food Production, Health, and the Environment”
  • Emmanuel Kreike, History, “Scorched Earth: Environmental Warfare as a Crime against Humanity and Nature”


Published in 2020

  • Yelena Baraz, Classics, “Reading Roman Pride (Emotions of the Past)” 
  • David A. Bell, History, “Men on Horseback:  The Power of Charisma in the Age of Revolution”
  • Anne Case and Angus Deaton, Economics, “Deaths of Despair”
  • Jacob S. Dlamini, History, “The Terrorist Album:  Apartheid’s Insurgents, Collaborators, and the Security Police”
  • Hal Foster, Art and Archaeology, “What Comes after Farce”
  • Eddie S. Glaude, Jr., African American Studies, “Begin Again: James Baldwin’s America and Its Urgent Lessons for Our Own”
  • Michael D. Gordin, History, “The Age of Hiroshima” and “Einstein in Bohemia”
  • Anthony T. Grafton, History, “Inky Fingers: The Making of Books in Early Modern Europe”
  • Harold James, History, “Making a Modern Central Bank: The Bank of England 1979-2003”
  • Claudia Johnson, English Literature, “30 Great Myths about Jane Austen”
  • Joyce Carol Oates, Creative Writing, “Cardiff, by the Sea:  Four Novellas of Suspense”
  • Lyman Page, Physics, “The Little Book of Cosmology”
  • James Peebles, Science and Physics, “Cosmology’s Century: An Inside History of Our Modern Understanding of the Universe”
  • Laurence Ralph, Anthropology, “The Torture Letters: Reckoning with Police Violence”
  • Marina Rustow, Near Eastern Studies, “The Lost Archive: Traces of a Caliphate in a Cairo Synagogue”
  • D. Vance Smith, English, “Arts of Dying: Literature and Finitude in Medieval England”
  • Robert Wuthnow, Sociology, “What Happens When We Practice Religion? Textures of Devotion in Everyday Life”
  • Julian Zelizer, History and Public Affairs, “Burning Down the House: Newt Gingrich, the Fall of a Speaker, and the Rise of the New Republican Party”

 

Published in 2019

  • Ruha Benjamin, African American Studies, “Captivating Technology: Race, Carceral Technoscience, and Liberatory Imagination in Everyday Life”
  • Carles Boix, Politics and Public Affairs, “Democratic Capitalism at the Crossroads: Technological Change and the Future of Politics”
  • Marina Brownlee, Spanish and Portuguese, “Cervantes’ Persiles and the Travails of Romance”
  • Anne Cheng, English and American Studies, “Ornamentalism”
  • Katie Chenoweth, French and Italian, “The Prosthetic Tongue: Printing Technology and the Rise of the French Language”
  • Chih-p’ing Chou, East Asian Studies, “Eyes on China: An Intermediate-Advanced Reader of Modern Chinese”
  • Jo Dunkley, Physics and Astrophysical Sciences, “Our Universe: An Astronomerp’s Guide”
  • Yaacob Dweck, History, “Dissident Rabbi: The Life of Jacob Sasportas”
  • Harry Frankfurt, Philosophy, “The Reasons of Love”
  • Paul Frymer, Politics, “Building an American Empire: The Era of Territorial and Political Expansion”
  • Tod Hamilton, Sociology, “Immigration and the Remaking of Black America”
  • Agustin Fuentes, Anthropology, “Why We Believe: Evolution and the Human Way of Being”
  • Tera W. Hunter, History, “Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century”
  • William Chester Jordan, History, “The Apple of His Eye: Converts from Islam in the Reign of Louis IX"
  • Atul Kohli, Politics and International Affairs, “Imperialism and the Developing World: How Britain and the United States Shaped the Global Periphery”
  • Kevin M. Kruse and Julian E. Zelizer, History, “Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974”
  • Yiyun Li, Creative Writing, “Where Reasons End: A Novel”
  • Michael Oppenheimer, Geosciences and International Affairs, “Discerning Experts: The Practices of Scientific Assessment for Environmental Policy”
  • Imani Perry, African American Studies, “Breathe: A Letter to my Sons”
  • Markus Prior, Politics and Public Affairs, “Hooked: How Politics Captures People’s Interest”
  • Laurence Ralph, Anthropology, “Torture Letters: Reckoning with Police Violence”
  • Ken Steiglitz, Computer Science, “The Discrete Charm of the Machine: Why the World Became Digital”
  • Paul Steinhardt, Physics, “The Second Kind of Impossible: The Extraordinary Quest for a New Form of Matter”
  • Keeanga-Yamahtta Taylor, African American Studies, “Race for Profit: How Banks and the Real Estate Industry Undermined Black Homeownership”
  • Frederick Wherry, Sociology, “Credit Where It’s Due: Rethinking Financial Citizenship”
  • Stacy Wolf, Theater, “Beyond Broadway: The Pleasure and Promise of Musical Theatre Across America”

 

Published in 2018

  • Alan Blinder, Economics and Public Affairs, “Advice and Dissent: Why America Suffers When Economics & Politics Collide”
  • David Cannadine, History, “The Country House Past, Present, Future: Great Houses of The British Isles”
  • Stanley Corngold, German and Comparative Literature, “Walter Kaufmann: Philosopher, Humanist, Heretic”
  • Marc Fleurbaey, Economics, Humanistic Studies and Public Affairs, “A Manifesto for Social Progress: Ideas for a Better Society”
  • Eddie Glaude, Religion, “An Uncommon Faith: A Pragmatic Approach to the Study of African American Religion”
  • Robert Gunning, Mathematics, “An Introduction to Analysis”
  • Andrew James Hamilton, Art and Archaeology, “Scale of the Incas”
  • Hendrik Hartog, History, “The Trouble with Minna”
  • Kosuke Imai, Politics, “Quantitative Social Science”
  • Claudia L. Johnson, English Literature, “The Beautifull Cassandra: A Novel in Twelve Chapters”
  • Brian W. Kernighan, Computer Science, “Millions, Billions, Zillions: Defending Yourself in a World of Too Many Numbers”
  • Erika Lorraine Milam, History, “Creatures of Cain: The Hunt for Human Nature in Cold War America”
  • Imani Perry, African American Studies, “May We Forever Stand: A History of the Black National Anthem”
  • Philip Pettit, University Center for Human Values, “The Birth of Ethics: Reconstructing the Role and Nature of Morality”
  • Daniel T. Rodgers, History, “As a City on a Hill: The Story of America’s Most Famous Lay Sermon”
  • Jacob N. Shapiro, Politics and International Affairs, “Small Wars, Big Data: The Information Revolution in Modern Conflict”
  • Patrick Sharkey, Sociology and Public Affairs, “Uneasy Peace: The Great Crime Decline, the Renewal of City Life, and the Next War on Violence”
  • Tracy K. Smith, Creative Writing, “Wade in the Water: Poems”
  • Sean Wilentz, American History, “No Property In Man: Slavery and Antislavery at the Nation’s Founding”
  • Robert Wuthnow, Sociology, “The Left Behind: Decline and Rage in Rural America” 
  • Keren Yarhi-Milo, Politics and International Affairs, “Who Fights for Reputation: The Psychology of Leaders in International Conflict”
  • Muhammad Qasim Zaman, Near Eastern Studies “Islam in Pakistan: A History”
  • Julian Zelizer, History and Public Affairs, “The Presidency of Barack Obama”

 

Published in 2017

  • Christopher Achen, Politics, “The Taiwan Voter” and “Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Government”
  • David Bellos, Comparative Literature, “The Novel of the Century: The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables”
  • Peter Brooks, Comparative Literature, “Flaubert in the Ruins of Paris: The Story of a Friendship, a Novel, and a Terrible Year”
  • Dalton Conley, Sociology, “The Genome Factor: What Social Genomics Tell Us about Ourselves, Our History, and the Future”
  • Rafaela Dancygier, Politics, “Dilemmas of Inclusion: Muslims in European Politics”
  • Maria DiBattista and Deborah Nord, English, “At Home in the World: Women Writers and Public Life, From Austen to the Present”
  • Karen Emmerich, Comparative Literature, “Literary Translation and the Making of Originals”
  • Paul Frymer, Politics, “Building an American Empire: the Era of Territorial and Political Expansion”
  • Daniel Heller-Roazen, Comparative Literature, “No One’s Ways”
  • Tera Hunter, History, “Bound in Wedlock: Slave and Free Black Marriage in the Nineteenth Century”
  • Brian Kernighan, Computer Science, “Understanding the Digital World: What You Need to Know About Computers, the Internet, Privacy and Security”
  • Stephen Kotkin, History and International Affairs, “Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941”
  • Fiona Maazel, Creative Writing, “A Little More Human”
  • Yair Mintzker, History, “The Many Deaths of Jew Süss: The Notorious Trial and Execution of an Eighteenth-Century Court Jew”
  • Grigore Pop-Eleches, Politics and International Affairs, “Communism's Shadow: Historical Legacies and Contemporary Political Attitudes”
  • Susan Stewart, English, “Cinder: New and Selected Poems"
  • Alexander Todorov, Psychology, “Face Value: The Irresistible Influence of First Impressions”
  • Eleni Vakalo (translated by Karen Emmerich), Comparitive Literature, “Before Lyricism”
  • Michael Wood, Comparative Literature, “On Empson"
  • Julian Zelizer, History and Public Affairs, “The Fierce Urgency of Now: Lyndon Johnson, Congress, and the Battle for the Great Society”
  • Viviana Zelizer, Sociology, “Money Talks: Explaining How Money Really Works”

 

Published in 2016

  • Christopher Achen, Politics, “Democracy for Realists: Why Elections Do Not Produce Responsive Government” 
  • David Baldwin, Political Science, “Power and International Relations: A Conceptual Approach” 
  • Leonard Barkan, Comparative Literature, “Berlin for Jews” 
  • David Bell, History, “Shadows of Revolution: Reflections on France, Past and Present” 
  • Harold James, European Studies, History and International Affairs, “The Euro and the Battle of Ideas”
  • Bruno Carvalho, Spanish and Portuguese, “Occupy All Streets: Olympic Urbanism and Contested Futures in Rio de Janeiro” 
  • Mung Chiang with Christopher Brinton *16, Electrical Engineering, PEC, “The Power of Networks: Six Principles That Connect Our Lives” 
  • Alec Dun, History, “Dangerous Neighbors:  Making the Haitian Revolution in Early America”
  • Michael Gordin, History, “Five Days in August: How WW2 Became A Nuclear War”
  • Richard Gott, Astronomy  “Welcome to the Universe” based on the enormously popular astronomy course
  • John Haldon, History, “The Empire That Would Not Die: The Paradox of Eastern Roman Survival 640 – 740” 
  • John Haldon, History, “A Tale of Two Saints: The Martyrdoms and Miracles of Saints Theodore 'the Recruit’ and 'the General’”
  • John Ikenberry, Politics and International Affairs, “After Victory:  Institutions, Strategic Restraint, and the Rebuilding of Order after Major Wars” 
  • Matthew Karp, History, “This Vast Southern Empire” 
  • Thomas Leonard, Economics, “Illiberal Reformers: Race, Eugenics and American Economics in the Progressive Era” 
  • Nancy Malkiel, History, “Keep the Damned Women Out: The Struggle for Coeducation” 
  • Helen Milner, Politics, “Sailing the Water’s Edge: The Domestic Politics of American Foreign Policy” 
  • Simon Morrison, Music, “Bolshoi Confidential” 
  • Tullis Onstott, Geosciences, “The Deep Life: The Hunt for the Hidden Biology of Earth, Mars, and Beyond” 
  • Alan Patten, Politics, “Equal Recognition: The Moral Foundation of Minority Rights” 
  • Esther Schor, English, “Bridge of Words: Esperanto and the Dream of A Universal Language” 
  • Sean Wilentz, American History, “The Politicians & the Egalitarians”